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Top 15 Depressing Jobs

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Sometimes a person gets lucky and finds the perfect job. Unfortunately, some of those jobs come with serious mental side effects. High stress, long hours, and emotional pressure can all contribute to occasional bouts of depression for employees in these professions. Lots of these jobs come with a lot of responsibility but very little control. If your career is in the top 15 and you’ve been feeling blue, it might not hurt to seek counseling from a licensed professional. 

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Did you know...

  • The single-most dangerous job in America is the lumberjack. According to statistics, a lumberjack is thirty times more likely to die on the job than an average worker in the U.S. Other dangerous jobs include logger and deep-sea fisher. Three of the safest jobs, on the other hand, are librarian, secretary, and salesperson.
  • Is there a hidden job market out there? Some studies show that between 70 – 80% of workers ended up in their position thanks to networking. That means 70 – 80% of jobs are not even listed! The most sure-fire way to get a job was an internal referral. Only 7% of applicants have one, but they made up 40% of new hires!
  • Are you chilly at work? Tell your boss that it actually hurts productivity. Studies show that when offices keep their temperatures cooler (around 67 degrees), workers make 44% more errors. That's compared to an office temperature ten degrees warmer (around 77 degrees). Another productivity hack? Have a short commute or walk/bike to work! These workers are happier on average.
  • Which state has the highest percentage of people who walk or bike to work? If you said New York, you'd be wrong! It's actually Alaska at 8.9%. New York comes second at 6.9%. If D.C. were a state, it would lead the way at 14.8%. Why Alaska? They have some of the highest gas prices in the nation. They also have numerous communities that aren't linked by drivable roads.
  • During an average lifespan, an American worker spends 90,000 hours at work. They also hold up to eight different jobs before the age of 40. An average wheeled office chair is rolled about eight miles per year. Lost a file at work? Workers spend an average of just under an hour per day looking for lost or misplaced items.