20 High-Paying Jobs That Don't Require a College Degree

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Gaming Manager

Gaming managers are the people who maintain the craziness and chaos of casinos. You’ll have to start out at an entry level and work your way up, and most casinos have in-house training for employees. There is a licensing process you must go through to become a gaming manager, but it mostly consists of a background check and a drug test.

Annual Salary Range: $65,000-$84,000

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Did you know...

  • Tuesday is the day of the week that most offices are full across the country. Throughout the year, Tuesday only has an 11% absenteeism rate, the best-attended day of the five-day work week. It makes sense. People cut out on Friday to get an early start on the weekend, and no one likes the Monday blues.
  • Which state has the highest percentage of people who walk or bike to work? If you said New York, you'd be wrong! It's actually Alaska at 8.9%. New York comes second at 6.9%. If D.C. were a state, it would lead the way at 14.8%. Why Alaska? They have some of the highest gas prices in the nation. They also have numerous communities that aren't linked by drivable roads.
  • We hope these job search statistics don't get you down! Recruiters look at your resume for an average of only six seconds. According to Glassdoor, an average job opening will result in 250 resumes. Only 2% of applicants will be called for an interview. Only 15% of hires are made from job board candidates; however, 42% of job seekers use job boards!
  • Are you chilly at work? Tell your boss that it actually hurts productivity. Studies show that when offices keep their temperatures cooler (around 67 degrees), workers make 44% more errors. That's compared to an office temperature ten degrees warmer (around 77 degrees). Another productivity hack? Have a short commute or walk/bike to work! These workers are happier on average.
  • The single-most dangerous job in America is the lumberjack. According to statistics, a lumberjack is thirty times more likely to die on the job than an average worker in the U.S. Other dangerous jobs include logger and deep-sea fisher. Three of the safest jobs, on the other hand, are librarian, secretary, and salesperson.